Pastry &amp; Baking Arts https://ice.edu/ en Chef Jürgen’s Hack for Pitting Stone Fruit https://ice.edu/blog/chef-jurgens-hack-pitting-stone-fruit <span>Chef Jürgen’s Hack for Pitting Stone Fruit</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79501" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abaker</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/16/2022 - 16:57</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/apricots%20for%20blog_0.jpg?itok=9p3rRGhL Pro tip: keep a wooden spoon at the ready. <time datetime="2022-08-16T12:00:00Z">August 16, 2022</time> Abbe Lewis — Content Director <p>Whether it's cherries, plums, peaches or apricots, juicy stone fruits are all the rage in the hot summer months. <a href="https://ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/faculty-profiles/jurgen-david">Chef Jürgen David</a>, ICE New York’s Director of Pastry Research &amp; Development, has a fondness of apricots specifically, as he was exposed to an abundance of apricot bounty growing up in Vienna, Austria.</p> <p>“To me it’s the ultimate Austrian fruit,” he says, noting that the Wachau Valley is well known for its production of apricots and grapes thanks to its tropical climate. (The Wachau Valley is also well known for producing some complex and delicious white wines, that often offer notes of — you guessed it — apricots.)</p> <p><strong>More from Chef Jürgen: <a href="https://ice.edu/blog/edible-flowers-for-cakes">A Pastry Chef's Guide to Working with Flowers &gt;</a></strong></p> <p>Chef Jürgen also has a handy hack for pitting apricots — or any stone fruit, for that matter — and it's simple: <strong>grab your favorite wooden spoon or spatula, take the end and stick it through the stem and push the pit through it.</strong></p> <p>“My grandmother did that,” he says, recalling that he even had his own special wooden spoon of choice. “It was broken, and instead of throwing it out, I used it to remove pits from stone fruits.”</p> <p>Once the apricots are pitted, Chef Jürgen often uses them to make his traditional Austrian <a href="https://ice.edu/blog/traditional-obstfleck-cake-recipe">obstfleck cake</a>, especially during the summer months.</p> <p>Both the cake recipe and the broken spoon are pieces of home that he carries with him through his culinary career - literally. His broken wooden spoon still lives in his tool kit, and he uses it for all stone fruits including apricots, plums, nectarines and peaches.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CgxItcQDeKv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14" style=" background:#FFF; 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border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CgxItcQDeKv/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Institute of Culinary Education (@iceculinary)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script> Pastry Arts Culinary Arts Summer Fruit <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=25311&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="PAxlZr_jiomhxaYL5UWfbdJx4txb5xBKHyWyCY7yD0c"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 16 Aug 2022 20:57:54 +0000 abaker 25311 at https://ice.edu How to Make Traditional Apple Strudel https://ice.edu/blog/how-make-traditional-apple-strudel <span>How to Make Traditional Apple Strudel</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79501" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abaker</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/17/2022 - 12:19</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/apple-strudel-HERO.jpg?itok=nSPTT3T1 ICE’s Director of Pastry Research &amp; Development shows us how to make his favorite pastry recipe. <time datetime="2022-06-17T12:00:00Z">June 17, 2022</time> Abbe Lewis — Content Director <p>Vienna native <a href="https://ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/faculty-profiles/jurgen-david">Jürgen David</a>, ICE’s Director of Pastry Research and Development, grew up making strudel with his grandmother in the traditional fashion, stretching pastry dough incredibly thin across a cloth-lined table, and then rolling it up. </p> <p>In fact, it’s one of the reasons he enrolled in pastry school in the first place. </p> <p>“Fridays in Switzerland was ‘Strudel Day,’ so I made strudel by myself all day,” he says of his time working at the Confiserie Himmel in Baden, Switzerland, where he was a machine, making upwards of 16 to 20 strudels on any given Friday. Making his favorite pastry in large quantities never bothered him. “It’s fun — and there’s no one who doesn’t like it. If you don’t like it, I can’t trust you.” </p> <p>Traditional Austrian strudel is a pastry comprised of thin layers of dough with an apple filling of tart apples (typically Granny Smith), sugar, raisins and walnuts, as well as sour cream. </p> <p>Chef Jürgen suggests adding the filling ingredients in a single layer after rolling out the dough; mixing the filling together prior to assembly will result in a soggy strudel as the sugar will draw the water out from the apples. Another tip from the strudel pro? Roll it in its entirety before trimming at the end — and always serve with a dollop of fresh whipped cream. </p> <p><strong><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info"><em>Learn more about earning a Pastry &amp; Baking diploma at ICE.</em></a></strong></p> <p><img alt="apple-strudel" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/content/blog-article/image/apple-strudel-INLINE.jpg" class="align-center" /></p> <p> </p> <h3>Apple Strudel</h3> <p><em>Yield: One 24”x4” strudel</em><br />  </p> <p> </p> <h3>For the Dough:</h3> <ul><li>135 grams all-purpose flour</li> <li>65 grams bread flour</li> <li>2 grams salt</li> <li>26 grams vegetable oil</li> <li>100 grams warm water</li> <li>Additional vegetable oil, as needed</li> </ul><h3>For the Cinnamon Sugar</h3> <ul><li>200 grams sugar</li> <li>8 grams cinnamon, ground</li> </ul><h3>For the Filling:</h3> <ul><li>15 grams butter</li> <li>35 grams breadcrumbs</li> <li>2 tart apples, such as Granny Smith, peeled and cored</li> <li>Juice of 1 lemon</li> <li>Flour, as needed</li> <li>120 grams clarified butter</li> <li>35 grams sugar</li> <li>20 grams rum</li> <li>20 grams raisins</li> <li>35 grams chopped walnuts, optional</li> <li>35 grams sour cream, optional</li> </ul> <h3>For the Dough:</h3> <ol><li>In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, combine the all-purpose flour, bread flour and salt.</li> <li>Add the 26 grams vegetable oil and water to the mixture. Turn the mixer on low speed and process the mixture until combined.</li> <li>Increase the speed to medium and continue mixing until the dough has come together. The final dough should completely come away from the sides of the bowl and have a smooth, elastic texture. </li> <li>Remove the dough from the bowl and shape it into a boule.</li> <li>Lightly coat the dough with a small amount of vegetable oil, then cover with plastic wrap.</li> <li>Let the dough rest for 20–30 minutes at room temperature.</li> </ol><h3>For the Cinnamon Sugar:</h3> <ol><li>Combine all ingredients and mix well. Store in an airtight container until ready to use.</li> </ol><h3>For the Filling:</h3> <ol><li>Melt the butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the breadcrumbs to the melted butter and stir until lightly toasted.</li> <li>Transfer the mixture to a half sheet pan lined with parchment paper to cool quickly.</li> <li>Cut each apple into six wedges. Next, cut each wedge into 1/8” slices. Toss the apple slices in a bowl with the lemon juice. Set aside until ready to use. </li> </ol><h3>For the Assembly and Finish:</h3> <ol><li>Preheat the oven to 390˚F (199˚C). Line the workstation with a clean tablecloth measuring at least 30” long by 30” wide.</li> <li>Remove the dough from the plastic wrap, then gently stretch it on the workstation until it measures approximately 30” long and 30” wide. Lightly brush the dough with a portion of the clarified butter.</li> <li>Add the cooled toasted breadcrumbs, cinnamon sugar, rum and chopped walnuts (if using) to the bowl of apple slices. Gently stir to coat. </li> <li>Using a spatula, spread the apples in  a 4” wide strip over the lower center 2/3 of the dough. Pipe a line of sour cream next to the apples, if desired.</li> <li>Trim the edges of the dough with a chef’s knife and discard excess dough. </li> <li>Roll up the strudel using the tablecloth, then transfer the strudel to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Brush the top of the strudel with remaining clarified butter. </li> <li>Place the strudel into the oven and bake for 15 minutes, or until crisp and golden.</li> <li>Cooked strudel should be cooled slightly before serving. Strudel can be cooled, wrapped and recrossed in the oven the following day.</li> </ol> Pastry Arts Baking Arts Recipe <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24956&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="gPpoEE0rBe9kPi_OQpe82ALWvAziwhrNVMt91EHsZDw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:19:18 +0000 abaker 24956 at https://ice.edu Chef Jürgen's Buchteln (From His Mother's Cookbook) https://ice.edu/blog/buchteln-recipe <span>Chef Jürgen&#039;s Buchteln (From His Mother&#039;s Cookbook)</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79881" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">crose</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/03/2022 - 11:40</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Untitled%20design%20%2835%29.png?itok=PoDwCFL7 Celebrating memories made with Mom over food <time datetime="2022-05-03T12:00:00Z">May 3, 2022</time> Carly Rose — Social Media Assistant <p>In celebration of Mother's Day, Chef Jürgen recreated one of his favorite childhood dishes: buchteln.</p> <p>Food does more than just sustain us. It connects us with the people we make it and share it with. We asked ICE chef-instructors for their favorite memories with their moms from time spent in the kitchen. Culinary Arts Chef-Instructor Chris Arturo remembers coming home from preschool to a "kiddie cheeseboard," complete with crackers, apples and string cheese.</p> <p>Lead Recreational Chef-Instructor Roger Sitrin said his mother's specialty was baking the perfect apple pie, which she'd make for holiday desserts or just to lift her own mood. Chef Roger's mother was often cooking to feed a family of six, and she was his inspiration for pursuing a culinary career.</p> <p>Even the not-so-perfect dishes created memorable moments. Chef Roger remembers one meal of hamburgers, frozen in the center and charred on the outside, served with instant mashed potatoes from the box. "My mother was a funny cook," he says. "She was either a gourmet chef or a complete disaster."</p> <p>For Chef Jürgen David, ICE's Director of Pastry Research and Development, quality time spent baking with his mom sparked his interest in pastry and baking. Growing up in Vienna, Austria, his favorite dish was <em>buchteln</em>.</p> <p>Buchteln, or Austrian sweet rolls, are yeast-raised dough rounds served with vanilla custard sauce and often filled with apricot or prune jam. This dish was a staple of Chef Jürgen's childhood. His mom has been making buchteln — always from scratch — for as long as he can remember.</p> <p>Chef Jürgen has fond memories of sitting in the kitchen with his mom and sister, watching the dough rise in a big bowl on the counter, waiting for it to be ready for the oven. "We used to eat them so quickly and when they were so warm that we'd get stomachaches," he said. "There were always leftovers, but they didn't last long."</p> <p>This Mother's Day, Chef Jürgen took a page out of his mother's handwritten cookbook and showed us how to make buchteln with vanilla sauce. Check out the full recipe below. </p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info"><em>Learn more about earning a Pastry &amp; Baking diploma at ICE.</em></a><br />  </p> <h5>Buchteln with Vanilla Sauce</h5> <ul><li>1000 grams all-purpose flour</li> <li>400 grams milk</li> <li>80 grams fresh yeast </li> <li>160 grams sugar</li> <li>120 grams butter</li> <li>100 grams whole eggs</li> <li>40 grams egg yolk</li> <li>Zest of 1 lemon, grated </li> <li>10 grams salt</li> <li>Prune jam, for filling</li> <li>Melted butter, for brushing</li> <li>Powdered sugar, for dusting</li> <li>Vanilla custard sauce, for serving<br />  </li> </ul> <ol><li>Combine all of the ingredients except the salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed for about 2 minutes.</li> <li>Remove the paddle attachment and switch to a dough hook attachment. </li> <li>Add the salt and mix on medium speed for 3 to 5 minutes or until developed. Use the window pane test to assess the dough. </li> <li>Turn the dough out into an oiled bowl and bulk ferment for about 1 hour.</li> <li>Gently turn dough onto a lightly floured work surface and roll to about 16 x 14 inches. Cut into 3-inch squares and pipe a small amount of filling on each square. </li> <li>Gather the corners and seal well. </li> <li>Place the rounds seam-side down into a buttered baking dish and let proof for about 45 minutes to 1 hour. </li> <li>Brush with melted butter and bake at 350°F in a convection oven, until evenly browned and instant read thermometer reads 200°F. Brush with more melted butter while hot from the oven. </li> <li>Lightly dust with powdered sugar before serving. </li> <li>Serve with vanilla custard sauce. <br />  </li> </ol> Recipe Pastry Arts <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24751&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="YgSKg751gsgHd1DXHKVDcfuAdNpsVHqm0mpNKBCCkk8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 03 May 2022 15:40:50 +0000 crose 24751 at https://ice.edu Chef Jürgen's Natural Dye Eggs-periment https://ice.edu/blog/naturally-dyed-eggs-easter <span>Chef Jürgen&#039;s Natural Dye Eggs-periment</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79881" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">crose</span></span> <span>Thu, 04/14/2022 - 22:20</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Untitled%20design%20%2832%29.png?itok=TXSXanrY Decorate eggs using what&#039;s in your garden. <time datetime="2022-04-14T12:00:00Z">April 14, 2022</time> Carly Rose — Social Media Assistant <p>Chef Jürgen tested out several methods to add color to eggs using natural dyes. Here's what worked — and what didn't. </p> <p>Easter is upon us, along with a bounty of egg-related traditions. Among them: egg decorating. Chef Jürgen David, ICE's Director of Pastry Research and Development, investigated how to take a natural approach to dyeing eggs, using coloring agents like beet powder and green tea.</p> <p>Chef Jürgen tried out several methods, attempting to find the most streamlined approach. This is the process he found most effective:</p> <p><strong>1. On a piece of cheesecloth, place herb leaves to create a design.</strong></p> <p>In the spirit of using natural ingredients, Chef Jürgen used herbs from <a href="https://ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/hydroponic-garden">ICE's hydroponic garden</a> to create designs on the eggs. The leaves cover part of the egg, keeping that portion white while the rest of it is dyed. The best method is to lay the herbs on the cheesecloth and wrap around the egg, rather than placing the herbs on the egg directly.</p> <p><strong>2. Wrap egg in cheesecloth. Pull together with a rubber band.</strong></p> <p><strong>3. Place cold egg in an inch of cold water and white vinegar.</strong></p> <p>The vinegar is a key component to the dye mixture. It's what makes the color actually stick to the egg.</p> <p><strong>4. Add desired dye.</strong></p> <p>The color achieved by each ingredient is not always intuitive. Red cabbage makes blue. Hibiscus makes gray. Bull's blood beet powder results in a gray-pink color.</p> <p>Chef Jürgen thought getting a red dye would be easy, but it was one of the more challenging colors. Bulls blood beets are known for their deep red color. They stained everything red...except the eggs. </p> <p><strong>5. Boil for approximately five minutes.</strong></p> <p><strong>6. Remove from heat and cover in foil.</strong></p> <p>Let the eggs cool at room temperature. Only put the eggs in the refrigerator after they are already cool.</p> <p><strong>7. Let sit overnight.</strong></p> <p>Artificial dyes only take a few minutes to add color to the egg. When using natural dyes, the egg needs to spend several hours in the dye mixture to achieve a noticeable color. </p> <p><strong>9. Remove egg from dye and unwrap cheesecloth.</strong></p> <p>Removing the cheesecloth and the herb leaves will reveal your eggs final color and design. Voilà: naturally dyed and decorated Easter eggs.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info"><em>Learn more about earning a Pastry &amp; Baking diploma at ICE.</em></a><br />  </p> Pastry Arts Holidays <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24666&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="KcwSa3c__rldiYvLyRcbeAMNRpPVn0ao6VpGx15fiH0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Fri, 15 Apr 2022 02:20:00 +0000 crose 24666 at https://ice.edu Chef Sohrob's Piping Bag Hacks https://ice.edu/blog/pastry-piping-bag-hacks <span>Chef Sohrob&#039;s Piping Bag Hacks</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79881" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">crose</span></span> <span>Tue, 03/22/2022 - 14:12</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Untitled%20design%20%2824%29.png?itok=iHudYUK6 Alternate between piping tips with ease. <time datetime="2022-03-22T12:00:00Z">March 22, 2022</time> Carly Rose — Social Media Assistant <p>Pastry &amp; Baking Arts Chef-Instructor Sohrob Esmaili shared his tips and tricks for seamless pastry piping.</p> <p>Piping is an essential skill in any pastry chef's toolkit, and switching between several tips and fillings can be time-consuming. In his classroom at ICE's Los Angeles campus, Chef Sohrob explains his hack of easily alternating between piping tips and frosting colors.</p> <p>First, place the piping bag in a cup or container to give it structure as you scoop in the frosting. To fill the bottom of the bag with frosting, hold the bag closed and swing it down and away from your body. The momentum will force the frosting to fill the tip of the bag.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CbLqRYYjZK-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:540px; min-width:326px; padding:0; width:50%; width:-webkit-calc(50% - 2px); width:calc(50% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:16px;"> <div style=" display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display:block; height:45px; margin:0 auto 12px; width:45px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CbLqRYYjZK-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank"><svg height="50px" version="1.1" viewbox="0 0 60 60" width="50px" xmlns="https://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="https://www.w3.org/1999/xlink"><g fill="none" fill-rule="evenodd" stroke="none" stroke-width="1"><g fill="#000000" transform="translate(-511.000000, -20.000000)"><g><path d="M556.869,30.41 C554.814,30.41 553.148,32.076 553.148,34.131 C553.148,36.186 554.814,37.852 556.869,37.852 C558.924,37.852 560.59,36.186 560.59,34.131 C560.59,32.076 558.924,30.41 556.869,30.41 M541,60.657 C535.114,60.657 530.342,55.887 530.342,50 C530.342,44.114 535.114,39.342 541,39.342 C546.887,39.342 551.658,44.114 551.658,50 C551.658,55.887 546.887,60.657 541,60.657 M541,33.886 C532.1,33.886 524.886,41.1 524.886,50 C524.886,58.899 532.1,66.113 541,66.113 C549.9,66.113 557.115,58.899 557.115,50 C557.115,41.1 549.9,33.886 541,33.886 M565.378,62.101 C565.244,65.022 564.756,66.606 564.346,67.663 C563.803,69.06 563.154,70.057 562.106,71.106 C561.058,72.155 560.06,72.803 558.662,73.347 C557.607,73.757 556.021,74.244 553.102,74.378 C549.944,74.521 548.997,74.552 541,74.552 C533.003,74.552 532.056,74.521 528.898,74.378 C525.979,74.244 524.393,73.757 523.338,73.347 C521.94,72.803 520.942,72.155 519.894,71.106 C518.846,70.057 518.197,69.06 517.654,67.663 C517.244,66.606 516.755,65.022 516.623,62.101 C516.479,58.943 516.448,57.996 516.448,50 C516.448,42.003 516.479,41.056 516.623,37.899 C516.755,34.978 517.244,33.391 517.654,32.338 C518.197,30.938 518.846,29.942 519.894,28.894 C520.942,27.846 521.94,27.196 523.338,26.654 C524.393,26.244 525.979,25.756 528.898,25.623 C532.057,25.479 533.004,25.448 541,25.448 C548.997,25.448 549.943,25.479 553.102,25.623 C556.021,25.756 557.607,26.244 558.662,26.654 C560.06,27.196 561.058,27.846 562.106,28.894 C563.154,29.942 563.803,30.938 564.346,32.338 C564.756,33.391 565.244,34.978 565.378,37.899 C565.522,41.056 565.552,42.003 565.552,50 C565.552,57.996 565.522,58.943 565.378,62.101 M570.82,37.631 C570.674,34.438 570.167,32.258 569.425,30.349 C568.659,28.377 567.633,26.702 565.965,25.035 C564.297,23.368 562.623,22.342 560.652,21.575 C558.743,20.834 556.562,20.326 553.369,20.18 C550.169,20.033 549.148,20 541,20 C532.853,20 531.831,20.033 528.631,20.18 C525.438,20.326 523.257,20.834 521.349,21.575 C519.376,22.342 517.703,23.368 516.035,25.035 C514.368,26.702 513.342,28.377 512.574,30.349 C511.834,32.258 511.326,34.438 511.181,37.631 C511.035,40.831 511,41.851 511,50 C511,58.147 511.035,59.17 511.181,62.369 C511.326,65.562 511.834,67.743 512.574,69.651 C513.342,71.625 514.368,73.296 516.035,74.965 C517.703,76.634 519.376,77.658 521.349,78.425 C523.257,79.167 525.438,79.673 528.631,79.82 C531.831,79.965 532.853,80.001 541,80.001 C549.148,80.001 550.169,79.965 553.369,79.82 C556.562,79.673 558.743,79.167 560.652,78.425 C562.623,77.658 564.297,76.634 565.965,74.965 C567.633,73.296 568.659,71.625 569.425,69.651 C570.167,67.743 570.674,65.562 570.82,62.369 C570.966,59.17 571,58.147 571,50 C571,41.851 570.966,40.831 570.82,37.631"></path></g></g></g></svg></a></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style=" color:#3897f0; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:550; line-height:18px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CbLqRYYjZK-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" background:#FFFFFF; line-height:0; padding:0 0; text-align:center; text-decoration:none; width:100%;" target="_blank">View this post on Instagram</a></div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg)"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style=" width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style=" width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style=" background-color: #F4F4F4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CbLqRYYjZK-/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by Institute of CulinaryEducation (@iceculinary)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async="" src="//www.instagram.com/embed.js"></script><p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info" rel=" noopener" target="_blank"><em>Study Pastry &amp; Baking at ICE</em></a></p> <p>Place a piping tip in an empty piping bag. Run scissors around the piping tip to cut the end off of the bag. Use a separate bag for each tip that you plan to use. Next, cut the end of the filled piping bag. Make sure it's wide enough to fit the largest piping tip you'll be using.</p> <p>Place the filled piping bag into the empty bag with the piping tip you'd like to use, and voilà, start piping. Switching between piping tips is as simple as slipping the filled bag out of one piping bag and into another. This can also be used to easily switch between fillings when you want to use the same tip for different types of frosting. </p> <p>A little bit of preparation beforehand makes the actual piping process much quicker. Try out Chef Sohrob's piping pro tip next time you need to juggle several piping tips and fillings. </p> Pastry Arts Baking Arts <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24546&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="MnQVOA6fB_sSmuhjOqn3a1158AVUD_Dx6ZSIG9BTrog"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 22 Mar 2022 18:12:23 +0000 crose 24546 at https://ice.edu The Techniques Behind Chocolate Showpieces https://ice.edu/blog/pastry-techniques-chocolate-showpieces <span>The Techniques Behind Chocolate Showpieces</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79881" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">crose</span></span> <span>Tue, 02/15/2022 - 12:30</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/Chocolate-Showpieces-Header.png?itok=r3O3VFid Where confection and construction meet <time datetime="2022-02-14T12:00:00Z">February 14, 2022</time> Carly Rose — Social Media Assistant <p>Valentine's Day is the busiest day of year for pastry chefs. Among the requests for heart-shaped chocolates and piped rosettes, many people want a prominent centerpiece for their table or event. Enter the chocolate showpiece.</p> <p>To successfully create a chocolate showpiece, a pastry chef must master several fundamental techniques. This elaborate and eye-catching confection is assigned to students at the end of the Chocolate Confections course within the Pastry &amp; Baking Arts program. Last week, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts students, led by Chef Jürgen David, ICE's Director of Pastry Research and Development, made their own chocolate centerpieces, with a very fitting theme: Valentine's Day. </p> <p><img alt="Chocolate showpiece" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/chocolate%20sculpture%20web.jpeg" class="align-right" /></p> <p>The final product looks extravagant, though the skills required to make it are very practical. Working in pairs, students come up with a design for their sculpture, then sketch and cut out templates. In addition to the templates, students learn how to use silicon mats to cast their designs. Arguably the most important ingredient in a chocolate sculpture is the chocolate, which must be properly tempered before it can used for construction. Learning how to temper requires a lot of practice, but it's the one of the most important skills for a pastry chef to master. Tempering requires careful melting and mixing of the chocolate, until it's shiny, smooth, and workable. About four to six pounds of chocolate go into one sculpture and all of it must be tempered correctly.</p> <blockquote> <p>"Learning how to temper is like learning how to walk for a pastry chef." – Chef Jürgen David</p> </blockquote> <p>Once the tempering is done, construction may begin. Students learn how to turn two-dimensional tempered chocolate shapes into three-dimensional, freestanding works of art. From building the base structure to adding colorful details, students discover what goes into successful, decorative construction. When it comes to confectionery structures, chocolate showpieces are an important staple to learn.</p> <p>Unlike sugar sculptures, chocolate showpieces are made to eat, not just to look at. By closing out the Chocolate Confections course with the start-to-finish construction of chocolate showpieces, ICE ensures its Pastry &amp; Baking Arts students have conquered the fundamentals of chocolate.</p> <p><em><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info" target="_blank">Study Pastry &amp; Baking Arts with Chef Jürgen.</a></em></p> Chocolate Pastry Arts <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24286&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="440XsluMqarkJv9R6Wz99Es47Kuc4jww5f0i9d1EkXU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Tue, 15 Feb 2022 17:30:00 +0000 crose 24286 at https://ice.edu Chocolate Trends for 2022 https://ice.edu/blog/chocolate-trends-2022 <span>Chocolate Trends for 2022</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79461" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ablustein</span></span> <span>Mon, 01/24/2022 - 10:05</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/chocolate%20trends%20header.jpeg?itok=HSIGSFbP Innovation, Sustainability and Awareness <time datetime="2022-01-24T12:00:00Z">January 24, 2022</time> Michael Laiskonis — Creative Director <p>A new year is upon us. It's a time for reflection, and also a time to look forward and set goals. </p> <p>As a longtime working pastry chef, I’m no stranger to thinking at the leading edge of fads and trends emerging both within the industry, and among guests and customers as well. Now that my headspace is increasingly occupied by issues affecting the world of chocolate, I’ve begun to consider trends that play out across the entire cocoa supply chain, from producer farmers and manufacturers to chefs and consumers. Below, I’ll tease out just a few of the factors influencing how we source, make and enjoy chocolate in the coming year.</p> <h5>COVID Rebounds</h5> <p>Now two years into the global Covid-19 pandemic, the emergence of new virus variants continues to affect every link in the cocoa supply chain. Not affected as quickly as countries in the Global North, many cocoa-growing countries have seen delayed but sustained impacts (and of course, individual countries have responded with a variety of policies). Peru has the <a href="https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">highest overall</a> death rate per capita; Brazil and Colombia remain within the top 15 of most affected countries. As cocoa is primarily grown by smallholder farmers in rural areas of developing countries, access to healthcare is less reliable; treatments and vaccines also tend to be <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/9/30/vaccine-apartheid-the-global-south-fights-back" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">distributed at a slower rate</a> among countries in the Global South. Pandemic-related disruptions will likely persist with day-to-day challenges among the already fragile economics of upstream cocoa production.</p> <p>International shipping has seen noticeable impacts since early 2020, affecting not just the transport of cocoa beans, but other raw ingredients and materials, such as packaging. The vast majority of the nearly five million tons of cocoa produced each year travels over water in shipping containers. In addition to stalled delivery times, the cost of transporting that freight has increased by over 400% of pre-pandemic levels.</p> <p><figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Drying cocoa beans with microlot producer Sabita Mykoo in Rio Claro, Trinidad" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/PDF/chocolate%20trends%20web.jpeg" /><figcaption>Drying cocoa beans with microlot producer Sabita Mykoo in Rio Claro, Trinidad</figcaption></figure></p> <p>Among chocolate makers, the supply of cocoa beans is only one part of the business equation; they have also needed to adjust to slower retail sales by focusing on reaching customers online. Changes in consumer behavior due to lockdowns has certainly shifted over the last two years. Manufacturers are still trying to understand what those changes look like and whether it will impact future behavior, but it appears that consumer demand has grown, and perhaps has even shifted toward higher quality chocolate products. Though many restaurants resumed ‘normal’ operations in 2021, new Covid-19 variants have created renewed insecurities. Many have shifted menu offerings in response to pandemic-related pivots. Increased ingredient costs and labor shortages are also affecting menu offerings and buying behaviors.</p> <h5>Innovations and Alternatives</h5> <p>Though still a tiny drop in the bucket of total chocolate production, the specialty (alternatively referred to as ‘craft,’ ‘artisan,’ or ‘bean-to-bar’) sector continues to grow, and with it a savvier consumer base. It can be a crowded and confusing field of options for consumers, but I look forward to continued efforts toward educating them on aspects of quality, flavor, formulation, sourcing and general sustainability issues. I observe a continued increase in emphasis and education on the nuances of single-origin flavors from both the industrial and specialty chocolate manufacturers — but have also noticed an uptick in added flavors and inclusions, from the familiar to the novel — drawing from on-trend ingredients, health-and-wellness and nostalgic flavor combinations. Small-scale makers are also focusing more energy on value-added products made with their chocolate — from baked goods to bonbons and panned confections.</p> <p>With several recent offerings from industrial makers (Barry Callebaut, Nestlé, Felchlin, Lindt and Ritter) over the last year or two, I think we will see more experimentation with ‘whole-fruit’ chocolates and other snacks sweetened not with conventional sugar, but with cacao pulp-derived sugars. These products may take a while to catch on among pastry chefs and chocolatiers due to unique flavors, differences in the chocolate’s workability and standard-of-identity issues (legal definitions of chocolate).</p> <p>Though a taste for the intense flavors of dark chocolate has increased, craft chocolate makers are changing our perception of what milk chocolate can be as well, with ‘dark milk’ products that offer higher cocoa percentages, adding extra complexity to familiar creamy textures we expect to find. We will also see increased use of alternative dairy products to produce plant-based analogs for milk chocolate, seeking to deliver a similar experience with on-trend milk replacers, like oat, cashew, almond and coconut. Alternative sweeteners are traditionally more difficult to incorporate into chocolate. There may still be some space for innovation due to the interest in low-carbohydrate diets, but sugar-free chocolate remains a niche market, though Hershey’s acquisition of the popular Lily’s brand in 2021 may be a signal that alternative sweeteners will one day break into the mainstream. The messaging and science on potential ‘healthy’ aspects of chocolate — notably the antioxidant-rich polyphenols that it may contain — are still a bit murky, but expect to see a steady increase in promotion of health-and-wellness positions as well.</p> <h5>Social Awareness</h5> <p>The chocolate industry is also at the forefront of social and environmental innovation. Generally, farmer incomes remain a top line item, and despite volatile world prices, the 2021 implementation of initiatives like the Living Income Differential (LID) in the largest producer countries Ivory Coast and Ghana seek to improve the economics at an institutional level. Forced and child labor on cocoa farms — an issue that created controversy two decades ago — continues to be discussed as well, with consequential cases currently circulating through the United States court system.</p> <p>The ‘whole-fruit’ cocoa pulp-sweetened products present an exciting opportunity toward ‘upcycling’ of components that typically go to waste over the course of the chocolate-making process. I think it will be interesting to see if other byproducts like cocoa bean shell (a waste product that comprises 15% of a cocoa bean) will see similar repurposing efforts at a large scale. Consider, for example, that at least 15% of the weight of the cocoa beans traversing the oceans in shipping containers is discarded; processing those beans and recycling the shell at origin could play a significant role in decreasing chocolate’s wide carbon footprint. Efforts to reduce deforestation linked to farming will also continue to be centered among conversations of the global cocoa industry. Ivory Coast alone <a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-cocoa-ivorycoast-deforestation/ivory-coast-lost-47000-hectares-of-forest-to-cocoa-production-in-2020-environmental-group-says-idUSKBN2AJ0T6" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">lost 116,000 acres</a> of forest in its cocoa-growing regions in 2020, despite industry pledges to halt deforestation.</p> <h5>Sustainability and a ‘Farm-to-Table’ Sensibility</h5> <p>Historically, chocolate-making has relied on a trade structure that sees raw cocoa beans traveling thousands of miles, imported into countries far from where the beans are grown. One important idea emerging from sustainability efforts is the creation of more economic and environmental value for cocoa-producing countries by increasing the manufacture of finished chocolate products at origin. I would love to see the well-accepted premise of ‘farm-to-table’ applied more to chocolate products, with proper recognition given to producers and the sense of place that can be expressed through chocolate.</p> <p>In addition to my work in the ICE Chocolate Lab, I’ve recently been recruited by the United Nations-backed program Alliances for Action to support and promote small-scale cocoa farming and chocolate production throughout the Caribbean, with projects in Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. In addition to technical support and assistance with new product development, the broader goals include sharing those stories of unique flavor and terroir along the entire value chain, all the way to chefs and consumers.</p> <p><em>The <a href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/explore-ice/chocolate-lab" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">ICE Chocolate Lab</a> in-person experiences have returned — check for updates on the <a href="https://recreational.ice.edu/Chefs/Detail/303" rel=" noopener" target="_blank">range of courses</a> available for pros and novices alike.</em></p> Chocolate Chocolate Lab Culinary Arts Pastry Arts Desserts Global Cuisine <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=24156&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="TF_X29E_7P8H7liITyqM63EOzf4I-DBWI8eUb9UJiJ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 24 Jan 2022 15:05:20 +0000 ablustein 24156 at https://ice.edu How to Make a Christmas Cookie Centerpiece https://ice.edu/blog/christmas-tree-cookie <span>How to Make a Christmas Cookie Centerpiece</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Thu, 12/09/2021 - 15:00</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/tree%20cookie%20header.jpg?itok=Mvr06meA Chef Penny shares her guide to the ultimate holiday dessert display. <time datetime="2021-12-08T12:00:00Z">December 8, 2021</time> Penny Stankiewicz — Chef-Instructor, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts, The Art of Cake Decorating <p>Standing a foot tall, this Christmas cookie tree is a show stopper for sure. With a few tricks of the trade and a little patience, you can make this gorgeous and delicious tree-shaped cookie display to bring a little holiday cheer to any space.</p> <p>To start, you need a great sugar cookie recipe. Though I’m including one, you can use any trusted one you like.</p> <p>There are many secrets to successfully decorated sugar cookies, and the first one is it needs to keep its shape after baking. So look for recipes that have little to no chemical leavening in them.</p> <p>I prefer to roll the dough between two sheets of parchment right after it’s made. Roll half of the dough for the tree to about 1/3-inch thick and a minimum of 13 inches tall and 10 inches wide. Roll the remaining dough for the ornaments to about half that thickness. You’ll want them thinner later when you attach the cookies to the tree. Chill the sheets of dough in the freezer for 15 minutes or so. If you don’t have room, the refrigerator works well but will take a bit longer. You want the dough to be cold and firm but not frozen. Cutting and baking a chilled dough will also help prevent the dreaded cookie spread.</p> <p><img alt="Tree shape template" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Tree%20Template.jpg" class="align-right" /><a href="https://www.ice.edu/sites/default/files/inline-images/Tree%20Template.pdf" target="_blank">Download and use the template</a> I provide to cut out the tree shape. Use a sharp paring knife or a utility knife to cut out the shape from the chilled dough sheet. You’ll also need to cut out a rectangle template to use as a base later. Use a small circle cutter to cut the ornaments and/or use the templates for the ornaments and the star that goes on top. Any trim from the dough can be rerolled and used again.</p> <p>Bake the chilled dough in the oven at 350˚F. The ornaments are done when there is a little golden brown around the edges, about 8-10 minutes for this size. The tree will take longer. Start checking it at about 15 minutes. You want to dry it out a bit more because it will need the strength to stand up. Let all the cookies cool completely.</p> <p>You can use royal icing to line and flood the cookie. You’ll need to let the royal icing dry overnight before trying to do anything else with the cookie, but if you want a fast and super clean look, you can use modeling chocolate to cover the cookie instead. Follow the recipe exactly, and then color it as you like when kneading the rested modeling chocolate. After the chocolate sets it will be pretty hard. You can microwave it in very short bursts to make it a bit easier to knead. And I mean it: short bursts, about five seconds each. Any more and it will separate out and become completely useless.</p> <p>After coloring and rolling it, cut the chocolate out using the same pattern you used for the cookie. The cookie will have spread a bit in the oven but still kept its shape. Using the template again, you’ll have a little edge of cookie showing, which I like. If you don’t, place the sheet of chocolate over the cookie and using a paring knife, trim it to shape. Attach the chocolate with some royal icing.</p> <p>You can ice the cookies with royal or with the same modeling chocolate. If using royal to decorate the cookie, make a double batch of the recipe attached. If just using it to glue, then you’ll only need the small batch. If using edible glitters, it's best to put them on right away when the icing is still wet. Sprinkle the glitter over the iced cookie and let it dry completely. To use the glitters on the modeling chocolate, paint the top of it with corn syrup to give the glitter something to stick to. When dry, you can brush off the excess glitter with a paintbrush. You can put glitter over a white flood icing, but it will look better if the icing is colored similarly to the color of the glitter. I used gold/yellow, red/red and green/green.</p> <p>On day two, attach the dry ornaments to the dry tree. Let this lie flat for about two hours to make sure it's secured. If using modeling chocolate to decorate the tree and ornaments, there is no need to let it dry so you can move forward right away. Pipe a small amount of royal icing on the back of each ornament cookie to attach it to the tree. I also used the stiff royal icing to pipe mounds of snow on the tree. Be creative! Let this dry for about two hours.</p> <p><img alt="Chef Penny with her Christmas tree cookies" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/Chef%20Penny%20with%20Christmas%20tree%20cookies.jpg" class="align-center" /></p> <p>Then, you’ll attach it to the foot. Pipe thick royal icing along the center of the base, and place the cookie on top. Have something heavy standing by, like a pan or quart container filled with water and covered, to hold the tree up while it’s drying. It will take several hours for it to dry securely enough to remove the supports.</p> <p>And that’s it! Go crazy with the décor or keep it simple. Be inspired by your family’s tree, the Rockefeller Center tree or like me, Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer and the felt animations of the ‘60s.</p> <p>And always keep in mind, it’s a holiday — so have fun.</p> <h5>Sugar Cookie</h5> <ul><li>510 grams unsalted butter</li> <li>675 grams granulated white sugar</li> <li>1020 grams all-purpose flour</li> <li>1 teaspoon baking powder</li> <li>1 teaspoon kosher salt</li> <li>1 egg</li> <li>4 yolks</li> <li>1 tablespoon vanilla extract or paste</li> <li>1 tablespoon rum or bourbon (optional for flavor)</li> </ul> <ol><li>In a 6-quart standing mixer with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy, or about 5-8 minutes.</li> <li>Add egg and yolks one at a time and mix only until combined. Add vanilla and liquor if you’re using.</li> <li>Combine the flour, baking powder and salt, and whisk to combine them well. Add dry ingredient in 2 to 3 increments, mixing only until combined.</li> <li>Divide the dough in half and roll half to 1/3-inch thickness no less than 14x10 inches, between two sheets of parchment.</li> <li>Roll the remaining dough a bit thinner. Chill both sheets until firm.</li> <li>Use the templates to cut the chilled dough into shape. If this takes a bit of time, chill the dough again before baking. Bake at 350 F. Ornaments are done when golden brown around the edges. Tree and stand should be baked further for strength. It will likely be light brown over the entire cookie.</li> <li>Cool completely before icing.</li> </ol><h5>Royal Icing</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>1 pound confectioners sugar</li> <li>3 egg whites</li> <li>1/2 teaspoon lemon juice</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Place all of the ingredients in the bowl of a mixer with the paddle attachment. Beat on medium speed until stiff peaks, or about 10 minutes or so.</li> <li>If using to ice cookies, double this recipe. Leave half of it as stiff, and make the remaining icing flood consistency. Add water, one teaspoon at a time, mixing completely until when you test it by dotting it on the counter, the test smooth’s over completely in a 10-second count. If too fast, add more confectioner sugar.</li> </ol><h5>Modeling Chocolate</h5> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>2 pounds white chocolate</li> <li>7 fluid ounces of corn syrup</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>In a microwave-safe bowl, melt white chocolate. First burst is 1 minute and stir. Continue with 30-second intervals and stirring between.</li> <li>Move to a bowl much larger.</li> <li>Place corn syrup in the microwave for 45 seconds just to warm.</li> <li>Pour corn syrup over the melted chocolate in a crosshatch pattern.</li> <li>Fold it together with no more than 24 -30 strokes. Mix this too much it and may break and not be usable.</li> <li>Remove modeling chocolate to a sheet pan lined with plastic wrap. Cover the top with plastic wrap and press into a thin sheet.</li> <li>For best results, let this sit for 8 hours or overnight to cure. If in a rush, you can refrigerate it to set. But this will not cure as well and could be a bit more oily to work with in the beginning. Use cornstarch to knead it if it's too oily.</li> <li>After the modeling chocolate has cured, knead it to bring it to rolling consistency. Color with powdered colors or gel pastes.</li> </ol><p><em>Study with Chef Penny in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/newyork/career-programs/school-pastry-baking-arts" target="_blank">Pastry &amp; Baking Arts at ICE.</a></em></p> Cookies Holidays Recipe ICE Instructors Baking Arts <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=22091&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="xOmXZ8htd_QylrJVVCH9KA3AaCzdm3wndxnZ-XMTjKc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Thu, 09 Dec 2021 20:00:00 +0000 aday 22091 at https://ice.edu Chef Jürgen’s Homemade Halloween Candy Bars https://ice.edu/blog/homemade-halloween-candy-bar <span>Chef Jürgen’s Homemade Halloween Candy Bars</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/79501" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abaker</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/18/2021 - 11:50</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/chefjurgen_halloweencandy_october2021_HERO.jpg?itok=ynjBW9f_ Making your own sweet treats from the comfort of your home has never been easier. <time datetime="2021-10-18T12:00:00Z">October 18, 2021</time> Abbe Lewis — Content Director <p>Have you ever wanted to make your own Halloween candy? ICE’s Director of Pastry Research and Development, Jürgen David, shares two candy bar recipes to spruce up your trick-or-treating.</p> <p>Full stop: candy is delicious, and whether it be bite- or king-sized, Halloween gives us an excuse to load up on all your favorite store-bought treats. But believe it or not, making a rendition of your own favorite candy bar can easily be done at home. <br /><br /> Chef Jürgen took some inspiration from some classic candy combinations, pairing up peanut butter and apple jelly, as well as dark chocolate and coconut. <br /><br /> “These candy bars are made with things you likely already have in your pantry,” he says. Indeed, the recipes below include both milk and dark chocolate, peanut butter, two basic types of cereal, marshmallow fluff, coconut and apple jelly. Don’t have apple jelly? Not to worry, Chef Jürgen encourages you to make a swap with whatever you have on hand. “Grape, raspberry and strawberry work just as well — think classic PB&amp;J.”</p> <p><em><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/blog/pastry-chef-jurgen-david">Meet Chef Jürgen.</a></em><br /><br /> Both bars feature a base consisting of crunchy corn flakes or crispy rice puffs with chocolate, and are topped with substantial fillings before being covered with their chocolatey outer shell. Set it and forget it, and either serve as is or cut it into bite-size pieces — you can’t get simpler than that. <br /><br /> “I loved the Junior Schokolade candy bar growing up,” says Chef Jürgen, nostalgic for the white chocolate bar studded with crispy rice cereal featuring a cartoon Brontosaurus mascot that he could find during his youth in Vienna, Austria. “The dinosaur sold me.” </p> <p><img alt="jurgen_halloween_candy_bar_2021" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/jurgen_halloween_candy_2021_INLINE.jpg" class="align-center" /><br /> Whichever recipe you choose, the end result is worth the effort (and you can swap the double-boiler for the microwave should you have time constraints). Soon your pantry will be fully stocked with homemade candy bars to your liking.</p> <p><a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://www.ice.edu/pastry-baking-arts-info"><em>Learn more about earning a Pastry &amp; Baking diploma at ICE.</em></a><br />  </p> <h5>Peanut Butter-Milk Chocolate and Apple Bars</h5> <p><em>Makes 6 1”x6” bars</em></p> <ul><li>120 grams white chocolate</li> <li>¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon</li> <li>60 grams crispy rice cereal, crushed or blitzed in a food processor</li> <li>150 grams smooth peanut butter</li> <li>75 grams confectioners’ sugar</li> <li>Pinch of salt</li> <li>100 grams apple jelly</li> <li>300 grams milk chocolate, for glazing</li> <li>Halloween sprinkles</li> </ul><h3>Directions</h3> <ol><li>Heat white chocolate in a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler until just melted. </li> <li>Using a rubber spatula, stir in ground cinnamon and crushed cereal.</li> <li>Pour mixture on parchment paper, cover with parchment paper and roll to a thickness of ¼-inch and about 5x6 inches in size. Transfer to a sheet pan and let it firm up for about 5–10 minutes.</li> <li>Using a serrated knife, carefully cut into six 1-inch strips. Set aside for later.</li> <li>In a medium mixing bowl, combine peanut butter, confectioners’ sugar and salt with a rubber spatula. Mixture will be firm.</li> <li>Place peanut butter mixture into piping bag fitted with a medium plain tip (about #4 or #5). Pipe two logs on each crispy chocolate strip, leaving some space in the middle.</li> <li>Using a second piping bag fitted with a small plain tip (#3), pipe apple jelly into the middle of the peanut mixture.</li> <li>Temper the milk chocolate and put into a piping bag, cut a small opening and pipe over one bar at a time.</li> <li>Top bars with Halloween sprinkles before milk chocolate hardens.</li> <li>If desired, cut bars into 3 or 4 pieces once set.</li> </ol><h5>Dark Chocolate, Coconut and Almond Bars</h5> <p><em>Makes 6 1”x6” bars</em></p> <h3>Ingredients</h3> <ul><li>120 grams dark chocolate</li> <li>60 grams corn flakes cereal, crushed</li> <li>100 grams dark chocolate, melted</li> <li>Pinch of salt</li> <li>100 grams heavy cream  </li> <li>100 grams dark chocolate (bitter sweet, 74%)</li> <li>150 grams marshmallow fluff</li> <li>150 grams desiccated coconut</li> <li>75 grams Coco Lopez cream of coconut</li> <li> ½ cup whole almonds, lightly toasted (about 36 pieces)</li> <li>300 grams dark chocolate, for glazing</li> <li>Marzipan skeleton pieces</li> <li>Halloween sprinkles</li> </ul><ol></ol> <ol><li>Heat 120 grams of dark chocolate in a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler until just melted. </li> <li>Using a rubber spatula, stir in crushed corn flakes.</li> <li>Pour mixture on parchment paper, cover with parchment paper and roll to a thickness of ¼-inch and about 5x6 inches in size. Transfer to a sheet pan and let it firm up for about 5–10 minutes.</li> <li>Using a serrated knife, carefully cut into six 1-inch strips. Set aside for later.</li> <li>In a medium mixing bowl over a double boiler, melt 100 grams dark chocolate.</li> <li>Heat 100 grams heavy cream. Pour over 100 grams dark chocolate. Let rest for about 1 minute.</li> <li>With a small whisk, make small, concentric circles until emulsified, smooth and shiny. Let cool at room temperature until ready to pipe.</li> <li>In a medium bowl, mix marshmallow fluff, desiccated coconut and cream of coconut together until smooth. </li> <li>Place coconut mixture into piping bag fitted with a medium plain tip (about #4 or #5). Pipe two logs on each crispy chocolate strip, leaving some space in the middle.</li> <li>Using a second piping bag fitted with a small plain tip (#3), pipe chocolate ganache into the middle of the coconut mixture.</li> <li>Place and line the whole almonds in a line in the center of each bar.</li> <li>Temper the dark chocolate and put into a piping bag, cut a small opening and pipe over one bar at a time.</li> <li>Top bars with marzipan skeleton pieces and Halloween sprinkles before dark chocolate hardens.</li> <li>If desired, cut bars into 3 or 4 pieces once set.</li> </ol> Pastry Arts Candy <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23731&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="_B-Q7Bv9oJ4PMS9UT1u5R0rZJ8svA05afsn4alfSotU"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Mon, 18 Oct 2021 15:50:51 +0000 abaker 23731 at https://ice.edu How to Make a Mold https://ice.edu/blog/custom-chocolate-mold <span>How to Make a Mold</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/15186" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">aday</span></span> <span>Sat, 09/25/2021 - 10:03</span> https://ice.edu/sites/default/files/styles/width_1400/public/content/blog-article/header-image/custom%20mold%20final%20header.jpg?itok=hHWouH_Y Pastry chef Penny Stankiewicz shares her custom sugar art tricks. <time datetime="2021-09-25T12:00:00Z">September 25, 2021</time> Penny Stankiewicz — Chef-Instructor, Pastry &amp; Baking Arts, The Art of Cake Decorating <p>In my cake decorating and sugar art business, Sugar Couture, one policy that has not changed since the beginning is a requirement that all my work is custom. That provides an exciting opportunity to find creative ways to make things happen for each client, like a custom chocolate mold.</p> <p>If a bride wants the lace from her veil to be replicated on her wedding cake, or I find a gorgeous trinket at an antique market that would be a perfect adornment for a cake, I have to find ways of bringing those details to life.</p> <p>Standing out in a crowded field means that I have to bring something to the table that other designers don’t. Making custom molds for uses in all formats are one of the ways I can make gorgeous and unique pieces that will only be found in my work. I was doing this long before there were so many commercially available molds.</p> <p>I love the challenge of figuring things out. What parts connect on a motorcycle’s engine? How is a dress constructed? The ability to break things down and replicate them is the true job of a sugar artist. A unique project I was tasked with recently: a chocolate bar created from a 3D-printed wavy art piece. The client had only one of these pieces.</p> <p>I have many tricks to make food-safe molds, and I make choices of which to use based on the needs of the piece. Is it large? Does it have a lot of detail? Lots of undercuts? Do I need one or many? Will this mold be used in high volume or just once? How much time do I have to create the piece?</p> <p>The original was very thin, undulating and rather large, about 4x7 inches. I needed only one chocolate piece for a specialty gift for a very discerning recipient. I chose to use a molding product for this that I could melt and pour over the prepared piece. It would set quickly, and since I only needed it once, I can remelt the material and make another mold.</p> <p>Prep was the most important step here. It's best if the materials I use to make a mold are not used for any other purpose. Here are the items I use:</p> <ul><li>Original piece to mold.</li> <li>Thin plastic cutting board or another non-silicone base that I won’t use for anything else.</li> <li>Depending on the size of the positive, a container that it fits in with only about a half-inch of space all around <strong>or</strong> L-brackets (metal or plastic) with binder clips or clamps.</li> <li>Petroleum jelly.</li> <li>Hairdryer or heat gun.</li> <li>Pot or microwave-safe bowl.</li> <li>Mixing spoon.</li> <li>Modeling clay.</li> <li>Mold-making material, in this case ComposiMold, which is reusable.</li> </ul><p>If the piece I want to make will fit in, say, a pint container with space all the way around it, I'll use something like that to make the mold. If you're making your own mold, look around and see what you have that you are ok parting with. If you plan on making many molds over time, investing in mold box L brackets is the way to go. This gives you the flexibility to make a mold any size you need.</p> <p>I prepare the base for the mold first. I've been using an inexpensive laminated shelf as the base, and a flexible cutting mat works great. Keep in mind some items may be damaged through this process. Many won’t, but if you’re planning on using something that is special or expensive to mold, you may want to consider that it can be damaged in the process.</p> <img alt="the custom mold making process" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/custom%20mold%20montage.jpg" class="align-center" /><p>I clean and dry the item well. In my case, the undulating card required something to support it underneath and to keep the mold-making material from going under the item. I kneaded clay, formed it into logs, and pressed it firmly underneath the piece to secure it and make sure it was well connected with no air gaps. The clay was about 1/3 inch thick in the lowest places. I pressed the clay to the shelf, and with a knife, trimmed off any excess clay so it was straight-sided. This will be the sides of my chocolate mold later.</p> <p>I then rubbed a small amount of petroleum jelly all over the surface of the plaque. Some items come out of molds perfectly and some struggle. The jelly helps the item release from the mold later. I always use it because if it doesn’t come out, I’ve wasted time and product. Silicone isn’t reusable, so it can be very costly to make mistakes. Take caution and use only as much petroleum jelly as needed. Too much can stop silicone from curing. Using a hairdryer or heat gun, gently heat the surface that has the jelly applied to get it into all the crevices, and then using a clean paper towel, remove any excess, leaving only a very thin coat. This step is most important for items with a lot of small detail.</p> <p><img alt="setting the chocolate mold" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/custom%20mold%20setting%20web.jpg" class="align-right" />Using L-brackets, I formed a box around the piece, with about a half-inch around it. Then, I rolled more thin logs of clay and secured them around the outside of the brackets on the board, pressing firmly to make the edges where they meet the board as air-tight as possible. This is security against the thin mold-making materials seeping out from underneath before it's had the chance to set.</p> <p>My piece is ready to go. If you use a smaller piece and you are going to try the pint container or some other kind of container you have on hand, you only need to secure the positive to the bottom. You can use clay, like I do, or there are products you can buy to anchor it to the base and the petroleum jelly can work, too. If you don’t need the piece again, you can use cool temperature hot glue, but the item has to be secured. If it isn’t, when the liquid material pours over, the piece will move and float, and the mold will not work.</p> <p>Once the piece is completely ready, I can prepare the material. ComposiMold material can be melted in a pot on a stove or in the microwave. I heat it slowly over medium-low heat until no lumps remain. For this product, heating should be done in a well-ventilated area. I stir while it's heating but not too much. Over-stirring can add air bubbles that will ruin the final mold.</p> <p>I like to get on a step stool to pour. The extra height gives me an advantage. I pour from a height in a very thin stream. The thin stream, with the help of gravity, will help pull out any bubbles that may have been incorporated during heating. I pour into a corner of the prepared mold box without moving around. When I stay in one place and pour slowly, the material fills all available areas efficiently. I pour enough material to have at least 1/4 inch on top of the piece. For my undulating piece, I needed much more material to get all areas covered and then have an even level on top.</p> <p>I allow this to cool and set. The beauty of this product is that I have the mold very fast. It's not material that will last a long time, so if you’re planning on making a mold that will be used over and over, this is not the product to use. But for quick turnaround, lots of detail and a product that can be remelted and used again, this is a great option.</p> <p>Once the mold is set, I remove the mold box or cut away the plastic container. Turning it upside down, I remove the clay and carefully peel back the mold, away from my positive. I wash it gently in soap and water, let it air dry or use the hairdryer to help. As this material is sensitive to heat, I don’t want to use too much here. Chocolate is fine, caramel is not. Towels or paper towels can leave debris that can get into the final product so air drying is best. I keep the clay, which can be reused.</p> <p><img alt="custom chocolate bar" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/final%20custom%20chocolate%20bar.jpg" class="align-right" />Now the mold is ready to use for tempered chocolate, fondant, gum paste or modeling chocolate. My final piece is poured dark chocolate, freeze-dried raspberries, airbrushed raspberry color and hand-painted dots to meet the client's brief.</p> <p>Having tricks like this in your toolbox means you can create whatever fantastical ideas you have and reproduce things that would otherwise be impossible with standard methods. Stand out from the competition by creating truly unique pieces that only you bring to life.</p> <p><em>Study sugar art with Chef Penny in <a class="link--round-arrow" href="https://ice.edu/art-of-cake-decorating-info" target="_blank">The Art of Cake Decorating at ICE.</a></em></p> Sugar Art Cake Decorating Cake Pastry Arts ICE Instructors <div class="row align-center blog--comments"> <div class="column small-12 medium-10 large-8"> <section> <h2>Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=23636&amp;2=field_blog_article_comments&amp;3=blog_article_comment" token="vrOmkiX80tZIo6WbEXKUP9WOf1Swsyf_uQI16UHVfpc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> </div> </div> Sat, 25 Sep 2021 14:03:19 +0000 aday 23636 at https://ice.edu